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Financial Primer For Self-Funded Startups, Part 1 | Preston Lee

Financial Primer For Self-Funded Startups, Part 1 | Preston Lee

ere’s a brief financial primer on what you need to understand before taking the big leap, and key issues you’ll need to grok for after ExampleTech begins operations.

[From: Financial Primer For Self-Funded Startups, Part 1 | Preston Lee]

Animoto: The No-Infrastructure Startup | Fast Company

Animoto: The No-Infrastructure Startup | Fast Company

Fast Interview: In this Q&A Animoto co-founders Brad Jefferson (CEO) and Jason Hsaio (president) discuss the crazy week their Facebook app caused traffic to spike from 25,000 users to 700,000, how their business couldn’t have existed before the advent of cloud computing and how, thanks to outsourcing, their biggest piece of hardware is an espresso machine.

[From: Animoto: The No-Infrastructure Startup | Fast Company]

OPEN Forum by American Express OPEN » Blog Archive Plan B for Fund Raising

OPEN Forum by American Express OPEN » Blog Archive Plan B for Fund Raising

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Step 1: You dig, scratch, and claw yourself to $100,000 of funds from your friends and family. Maybe you work as a YCombinator company. You take no salary. You live with your parents, and you keep your day job at Microsoft. You hope your spouse doesn’t get laid off. You have no office, but work virtually and meet your co-founders at Starbucks if you have to. Everything you use is Open Source or shareware.
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Step 2: Rather than trying to boil the ocean (”the mobile sector”), you boil a tea kettle. Rather than paying to attend high-end conferences, you hang out in the lobbies of the hotels where the events are and meet the same people for free. Rather than hiring a PR firm, you suck up to bloggers and hope they cover your product. Rather than buying booth space, you get on Twitter and use it to gain a reputation for your product.
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Step 3: You’re late with your product too (because everyone is late), but you’re not burning $250,000/month, and you don’t have to tell increasingly greater lies at monthly board meetings. Finally, you release your prototype. TechCrunch covers your release because you wrote Mike Arrington a compelling one-paragraph message that you sent on a Friday afternoon because you know he reads email on weekends.
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Step 4: This is where the miracle occurs–lo and behold, people like your product. (Truly, miracles have to occur whether you’re bootstrapping or venture-capital funded. It’s just that if you’re bootstrapping, there’s more time for the miracle to happen, and a smaller miracle suffices.) Month to month, you’re showing 10-15% growth, and monetization, praise God, has started.
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Step 5: Now you have options. First, you can contact venture capitalists with a company that’s already shipping to raise capital to expand your business. This is a very different discussion than raising capital to build a product. Second, you can continue to bootstrap and grow by using your cash flow. Three, you can pick up the phone and agree to meet with Google, Yahoo!, Fox Interactive, or any other company that has noticed you.

[From: OPEN Forum by American Express OPEN » Blog Archive Plan B for Fund Raising]

Plan As You Go

Plan As You Go

Plan as you Go business plan writing advice

[From: Plan As You Go]

QCon 2007 SFO Tracks

Tracks

Excellent technical decks on architecture and best practices in engineering winning web sites

[From: Tracks]

The Cheap Revolution: Top 12 Books for Entrepreneurs

The Cheap Revolution: Top 12 Books for Entrepreneurs
Sean comments on the cheap revolution blog with some good books to read

This is a good list for the concept stage, I would add “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen and “Four Steps to the Epiphany” by Steve Blank for your concept stage list. For a marketing focused list I would point to an article that Mark Duncan (http://www.askmar.com/) and I collaborated on “Crucial Marketing Concepts” that’s available in a short and long form here:
http://www.skmurphy.com/resources/emerging-product-introduction/
the long form also includes book reviews for a dozen good books on new product introduction.

There is also a good list of business books at
http://personalmba.com/recommended-business-books/
that you might want to think about for your Launch Stage section.

I would also second the movies “Startup.Com” and Tucker from Peter Ireland’s list (but none of the others) and add the “Triumph of the Nerds” documentary by Robert Cringely on PBS.

[From: The Cheap Revolution: Top 12 Books for Entrepreneurs]

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